GE2010: It has begun

Tuesday, 6th April 2010 at 14:31 UTC 7 comments

The starting gun sounded this morning for the 2010 UK General Election, affectionately known as GE2010, or #GE2010 to be a little more precise. The election of the twitter age is upon us and the parties have begun laying out that which shall be analysed, tweeted and re-tweeted for 4 weeks. I saw the speeches from Cameron and Brown this morning, and here’s some first thoughts.

The choice of companions for the big announcement was interesting. Brown stood amongst a school-photo-esque line up of the cabinet, with its much improved number of women alongside the men. The WAG-factor was on hold (unless I missed something) as the PM emerged with his two closest fellow troops, the chancellor and the deputy PM. Was this because he’s unable to govern without them? Possibly. Is this a good thing? You bet!

Cameron was amongst a clearly select bunch of cronies eager for their moment of fame. Surely if this was a public announcement, in a public space more accessible than the already highly accessible corridors of Westminster (I’d like to see someone Green Card Cameron in that private building, pointing over the water to that public building) why did no one manage to find a placard to wave behind him? And the horizontal banner in Trafalgar Square as Brown was driven to see the Queen, what was that all about?

Nowhere could I see the people Cameron wants to have run the country. The man is on a mission that his friends can only destroy, be they the total liability Chris Grayling, or the childish imposter Osborne. The fact is, they aren’t going to win him points. They’re airbrushed out, instead replaced by his entirely a-typical wife. WAG factor to 11, a Britain of men flanked by their charming, cupcake baking wives.

I realise all of this is just cheap politicking, but the fact is, Labour are bringing a team worth electing, and Brown is proud of them, committed to them, ready to motivate them to each to do their best. Cameron just doesn’t inspire that trust. And given “its the Economy, stupid”, why not show us who’s going to run that. This election is as much about the Chancellorship as it is about Prime Ministership. Its about electing 649 Men and Women to represent, and not just the one person who will wear the hat of Prime Minister.

And the speeches? Interesting how Gordon put Jobs before Prosperity. Interesting how Cameron seemed to want to offer almost nothing in assurances to people who aren’t hard working Britons because there’s no work for them to do. In credit to Cameron, he said all the right things, but the words fell from the wrong lips. It would be like McDonalds claiming to have the answer to world hunger. His Privilege oozing from him, he tried to cast himself as someone we, the attention-paying-public, know he isn’t. Its the effect Isaiah would have had had he arrived on a war horse in full bling to tell the rich of Israel to stop abusing their workers; truth, but oh so jarring.

Gordon made the three promises we knew he was going to make: the economic, political and social change we expect any politician to promise. Its not ambitious, it promises only to make the decisions that need making.  He promises a new economics, but we know that economics cannot honestly mean better behaved bankers; Turkeys don’t vote for Christmas, the Bankers are lining up to vote Tory. If the public want better behaved bankers, they should vote against them. No one is offering a change in the economic system at this election. Either they are offering to play the game on behalf of the rich or attempt to balance it out for the poor. Elections are not about system change, and they’re rarely about tackling the privileged head on. They’re about getting the people who will do the day-to-day management the right way.

Brown proudly showed us who his team will be, Cameron found them too embarrassing and instead chose to bring along his wife as a sort of alpha-male’s trophy. Which would you rather managed your office? Which would you rather steered Britain through the next 5 years?

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Entry filed under: Britain, Conservatives, Elections, Labour Party, News, Party Politics, Politics.

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7 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Greg  |  Wednesday, 7th April 2010 at 11:23 UTC

    “Labour are bringing a team worth electing, and Brown is proud of them, committed to them, ready to motivate them to each to do their best. Cameron just doesn’t inspire that trust. And given “its the Economy, stupid”, why not show us who’s going to run that.”

    You’re right, the election’s about trust. How far do I trust a man who claimed to have ended boom and bust? Come off it Graham, the one thing we can trust were Labour to win another term, would be that they would spend 5 years tearing each other to shreds while Rome burns. As for showing us who’s going to run the economy, you may have noticed he was on primetime telly just a week ago? See http://www.channel4.com/programmes/ask-the-chancellors/4od

    I’m afraid your language throughout the post is too powerful. It’s filled with insults, it shows someone who will vote on prejudice and won’t let the facts sway their vote. If your opinion can’t change in response to events, it’s worthless. I have no time for tribal loyalties here.

    Watching leftists is nicely amusing at the moment. They hate the last government for what it’s done and how it’s let them down, but it would be too hard for them to admit what’s best and vote for the other lot. They therefore all suddenly start singing the praises of people I know they hate. The expressions on their faces are really quite funny in a slightly sadistic sort of way.

    Reply
    • 2. Graham Martin  |  Wednesday, 7th April 2010 at 15:42 UTC

      Erm, your comment about Osborne being on telly is humorous – by all accounts he looked least credible of the lot.

      You seem to be painting the picture of people ‘realising’ they need to leave Labour when in fact many people (though putting a figure to it is difficult) are moving from Lib Dems to Labour, and turnout is likely to have a big effect: the Left always wins on turnout. As the images of the 1980’s are brought to the public’s mind, the number of people prepared to sit by and watch the Tories win will go down (enough? I don’t know).

      If I was “voting for the other lot”, it would be my normal Green stomping ground, not the Tories. There are plenty of parties out there that are concerned with community and fighting privilege that Labour are a bit pale by comparison. If I wanted a world based on privilege, I’d be voting for either UKIP or Tories.

      Reply
    • 3. Emily  |  Saturday, 10th April 2010 at 21:18 UTC

      “I’m afraid your language throughout the post is too powerful. It’s filled with insults, it shows someone who will vote on prejudice and won’t let the facts sway their vote. If your opinion can’t change in response to events, it’s worthless. I have no time for tribal loyalties here” <—— this!

      Reply
  • 4. steve thack  |  Wednesday, 7th April 2010 at 13:10 UTC

    Greg your not going going to hear all of us on the left singing the praises of folks you know we hate. no i’m not going to support the other lot , bar a handfull of issues i think they’d be worse. but labour have gone too far. the last 13 years has seen iraq, afganistan, PFI, rise of the survailance society, a loss of civil liberty, and much more. a failure to regulate the banking sector, a failure to reduce relative poverty in this country, a failure to act on the environment. a failure to treat asylum seekers with dignity, and a combination of policies that increased imigration from eastern europe with retoric that talked of imigration as a bad thing – no wonder we’ve see a rise on the far right, i’m not saying the eastern european imigration was a bad thing i’m saying the governemt failed to defend it as a positive which contirubted to the current climate.

    labour party are bowing out with the over the top draconian digital economy bill , this really doesn’t seem to be time to reward them with another 5 years.

    even staunch labour voters should be able to see that another term of this lot is not in the best interests of the country, the wider labour movement or the party. labour win this one and they’ll be limping on much like major in 92 to 97. lose now, rethink policy and get the real prats out of the party and the labour party could be in reasonable position in five years.

    Reply
  • 5. Greg  |  Wednesday, 7th April 2010 at 14:00 UTC

    I agree with your last paragraph, any Tory government formed now will have to earn its stripes to get re-elected, whereas by the end of another term of Gordon (if he lasted that long), everyone would hate Labour so much that we’d have another ~20 year government.

    Reply
    • 6. Graham Martin  |  Wednesday, 7th April 2010 at 15:05 UTC

      Given they’ve already courted the Ulster Unionists in readiness to form a coalition with them, its not likely they’ll try and earn those stripes from anti-racists, is it?

      Reply
  • 7. victorianstreeturchin  |  Saturday, 10th April 2010 at 17:28 UTC

    And now, a party-political broadcast from The Labour Party.

    The differences between the big three are so agonisingly minute that it matters not one whit whether you vote for the supposedly more progressive faction – just because the colour’s red and it has the word ‘Labour’ in it does not mean it has the faintest connection to the working-class or the labour movement insofar as it exists anymore.

    Did you catch Comrade Brown insulting strikers last week? Well, I suppose that’s pretty de riguer in the Labour Party anyway.

    http://libcom.org/library/labouring-vain

    -Corey James Soper

    Reply

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